The grudge match. ANT vs SCOT

The following essay will discuss the relationship between technology and society with a focus on Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and the theory of Social Construction of Technology (SCOT). To better understand this relationship, the essay will center on the interactions that occur between the two entities. It will argue that although ANT and SCOT theory share a similar hypothesis, the strength and weaknesses of each theory can be found in the different way each conceptualises the interaction between technology and society.

Continue reading The grudge match. ANT vs SCOT

Online collaboration; what’s in it for me?

Individuals’ motivations define group collaborations. This essay will argue that motivation is what drives users to collaborate online, and ultimately decides the type of community they choose to collaborate with. With a focus on the concept of Communities of Practice (CoP), this paper will explore the reasons why different forms of online collaboration and organisation appear to be similar in nature, but are ultimately divergent.

Continue reading Online collaboration; what’s in it for me?

Scaling the walls of personalised curation

July 20, 2011

Curation is the art of telling a story. As soon as a piece of content attracts a title, comment or reference to another work, it has been curated (Shott, 1996). This essay will argue that online, curation is too often used as a tool of expedient initiation and personalisation, which leads to data lockout, and walled information ecologies that are hard to navigate. This paper will discuss the pitfalls of allowing the content we interact with, produce and consume to be curated for us, rather than curating it for ourselves.

Continue reading Scaling the walls of personalised curation

Scaling the walls of personalised curation

Curation is the art of telling a story.  As soon as a piece of content attracts a title, comment or reference to another work, it has been curated (Shott, 1996). This essay will argue that online, curation is too often used as a tool of expedient initiation and personalisation, which leads to data lockout, and walled information ecologies that are hard to navigate. This paper will discuss the pitfalls of allowing the content we interact with, produce and consume to be curated for us, rather than curating it for ourselves.

Continue reading Scaling the walls of personalised curation